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Mission


The Black Student Alliance at Yale, otherwise known as BSAY, is a multi-cultural organization dedicated to enhancing the lives of Black students at Yale through political action, community action, and social events.

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Mission


The Black Student Alliance at Yale, otherwise known as BSAY, is a multi-cultural organization dedicated to enhancing the lives of Black students at Yale through political action, community action, and social events.

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Meet The Board


Meet The Board


NIA BERRIAN: PRESIDENT Nia is a Junior in Berkeley College, majoring in Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology. 

NIA BERRIAN: PRESIDENT

Nia is a Junior in Berkeley College, majoring in Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology. 

  KENDALL EASLEY: PUBLICIST Kendall is a Sophomore in Ezra Stiles College, planning on majoring in political science.

 

KENDALL EASLEY: PUBLICIST

Kendall is a Sophomore in Ezra Stiles College, planning on majoring in political science.

MAXWELL RICHARDSON: COMMUNITY ACTION CHAIR Maxwell is a Sophomore in Timothy Dwight College from Chicago, Illinois. He is a prospective Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology major and hopes to concentrate on Neurobiology. Additionally, he hopes to be a Global Health scholar.

MAXWELL RICHARDSON: COMMUNITY ACTION CHAIR

Maxwell is a Sophomore in Timothy Dwight College from Chicago, Illinois. He is a prospective Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology major and hopes to concentrate on Neurobiology. Additionally, he hopes to be a Global Health scholar.

MYKAELA JOHNSON: VICE PRESIDENT Mykaela is a Junior in Morse College, planning on double majoring in History of Science, Medicine, and Public Health and Ethnicity, Race and Migration. 

MYKAELA JOHNSON: VICE PRESIDENT

Mykaela is a Junior in Morse College, planning on double majoring in History of Science, Medicine, and Public Health and Ethnicity, Race and Migration. 

UZO BIOSAH: MEMBERSHIP COORDINATOR Chibuzor (Uzo) Biosah is a Sophomore in Trumbull College, potentially majoring in Cognitive Science. 

UZO BIOSAH: MEMBERSHIP COORDINATOR

Chibuzor (Uzo) Biosah is a Sophomore in Trumbull College, potentially majoring in Cognitive Science. 

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History


In September 1964, 14 black male students matriculated to Yale, a record number for the time. Along with black upperclassmen, these freshmen launched the first Spook Weekend, a huge social weekend that brought hundreds of Black students to Yale from throughout the Northeast. The next year, the Yale Discussion Group on Negro Affairs was founded. The discussion group soon became the Black Student Alliance at Yale, (BSAY), in 1967. Among the founding members of BSAY were Donald Ogilvie ’68, Armstead Robinson ’69, Glen DeChabert ’70, Woody Brittain ’70, Craig Foster ’69, and Ralph Dawson ’71. BSAY advocated for increased black enrollment, the development of Afro-American Studies, improved relations with the African-American community of New Haven, and the establishment of a cultural center for black students on Yale’s campus.

History


In September 1964, 14 black male students matriculated to Yale, a record number for the time. Along with black upperclassmen, these freshmen launched the first Spook Weekend, a huge social weekend that brought hundreds of Black students to Yale from throughout the Northeast. The next year, the Yale Discussion Group on Negro Affairs was founded. The discussion group soon became the Black Student Alliance at Yale, (BSAY), in 1967. Among the founding members of BSAY were Donald Ogilvie ’68, Armstead Robinson ’69, Glen DeChabert ’70, Woody Brittain ’70, Craig Foster ’69, and Ralph Dawson ’71. BSAY advocated for increased black enrollment, the development of Afro-American Studies, improved relations with the African-American community of New Haven, and the establishment of a cultural center for black students on Yale’s campus.

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Goals


On campus, we strive to meet the needs of the Black community by holding weekly meetings that are pertinent to the lives of Black students on campus and that create a supportive community for all Black students at Yale. BSAY strives to create a safe and active community in order to adequately represent and respond to the Black community. This sense of community must come from both current social activities and from a sense of shared history and culture.

Goals


On campus, we strive to meet the needs of the Black community by holding weekly meetings that are pertinent to the lives of Black students on campus and that create a supportive community for all Black students at Yale. BSAY strives to create a safe and active community in order to adequately represent and respond to the Black community. This sense of community must come from both current social activities and from a sense of shared history and culture.

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End


"It is our duty to fight for our freedom. It is our duty to win. We must love each other and support each other. We have nothing to lose but our chains." - Assata Shakur

 

 

End


"It is our duty to fight for our freedom. It is our duty to win. We must love each other and support each other. We have nothing to lose but our chains." - Assata Shakur

 

 

History and Goals of BSAY


History and Goals of BSAY


The Black Student Alliance at Yale (BSAY) is a multi-cultural organization dedicated to enhancing the lives of Black students at Yale through political action, community action, and social events.

In September 1964, 14 black male students matriculated to Yale, a record number for the time. Along with black upperclassmen, these freshmen launched the first Spook Weekend, a huge social weekend that brought hundreds of Black students to Yale from throughout the Northeast. The next year, the Yale Discussion Group on Negro Affairs was founded. The discussion group soon became the Black Student Alliance at Yale, or BSAY, in 1967. Among the founding members of BSAY were Donald Ogilvie '68, Armstead Robinson '69, Glenn deChabert '70, Woody Brittain '70, Craig Foster '69, and Ralph Dawson '71. BSAY advocated for increased black enrollment, the development of Afro-American Studies, improved relations with the African-American community of New Haven, and the establishment of a cultural center for black students on Yale's campus.

On campus, we strive to meet the needs of the Black community by holding weekly meetings that are pertinent to the lives of Black students on campus and that create a supportive community for all Black students at Yale. BSAY strives to create a safe and active community in order to adequately represent and respond to the Black community. This sense of community must come from both current social activities and from a sense of shared history and culture.

"It is our duty to fight for our freedom. It is our duty to win. We must love each other and support each other. We have nothing to lose but our chains." - Assata Shakur